Tutorials

studentcoring_klmckeeI realize that most students and science professionals are extremely busy and hardly have time to learn videography.  For this reason, I have been developing a series of tutorials designed to aid the scientist who wants to incorporate video into their research or education activities but who hasn’t the resources to hire a film crew or media specialist. The tutorials I’ve listed below will allow anyone with a smartphone or an iPad to begin making reasonably good videos that can be used to advertise a new research project, to create supplementary information for a journal article, or to enhance a website. In most cases, an hour’s investment is all that is necessary to gain the basic knowledge needed to shoot and edit a short video with an iPad, for example.

Note that I’ve listed all tutorials that I’ve made since starting this website, including ones that have been updated to reflect new versions of hardware or software. So be sure to scan through to find the one that fits your version. I’ll be adding more tutorials in the future. If you have suggestions, please leave a comment on the relevant post or email me (go to Contact page).

iMovie 10.0 and up (version released in 2013)

iMovie Tutorial: Part 1

iMovie Tutorial: Part 2

iMovie Tutorial: Part 3

iMovie Tutorial: Part 4

iMovie Tutorial: Part 5

iMovie Tutorial: Part 6

iMovie ’11 (earlier version)

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 1imovie11_screenshot_klmckee

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 2

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 3

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 4

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 5

iMovie 11 Tutorial: Part 6

How to Upload Your Science Video to a Video-Sharing Site

iMovie for the iPad:

How to Make a Book Trailer with your iPad or iPhone

Create Science Videos with your iPad

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 1screenshot_ipad_imovie_klmckee

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 2

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 3

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 4

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 5

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 6

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 7

Making Science Videos with your iPad Tutorial: Part 8

Avid Studio for the iPad

Tutorial: Avid Studio for the iPad (Part 1)

Tutorial: Avid Studio for the iPad (Part 2)

Photoshop:screenshot_photoshop_klmckee

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Remove the Background from an Image (Part 1)

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Remove the Background from an Image (Part 2)

How to Create and Use an Electronic Whiteboard in Your Videos

PowerPoint:

How to Make an Animation in PowerPoint: Part 1

How to Make an Animation in PowerPoint: Part 2

How to Record a PowerPoint Presentation with Screencapture Software

iPhone (and other Smartphones):

Filming with a Smartphone: 20 Basic Camera Shots

How to Edit an iPhone Video to Create an Eye-Catching Bulletin

How to Shoot Better Video with an iPhone

iMovie for iOS Tutorial Updated

iPhone Slow Motion Tutorial

How to Create a Time-Lapse Video with Your Smartphone

How to Create a Science Video with Your Smartphonescreenshot_iphone_klmckee

How to Make a Science Video with Videolicious and an iPhone

Using iPhone Panorama Images in Your Science Videos

New Gear for the Solo Science Videographer

GoPro Hero

360° Time Lapse with a GoPro Hero 4

How to Use QuickTime to Edit GoPro Videos

Using a GoPro Hero 3+ to Film Underwater

Field Testing a Quadcopter with GoPro Hero 3+ Camera

GoPro Hero 3+ Slow Motion Tutorial

Time Lapse Tutorial for GoPro Hero 3+

Screenflow:

How to Record a PowerPoint Presentation with Screenflow (updated)

How to Record a PowerPoint Presentation with Screencapture Software

QuickTime

How to Record a Movie with QuickTime

How to Use QuickTime to Edit GoPro Videos

Filming Accessories:

A Shutter Remote Controller for Your iPhone Camera

How to Improve the Audio of Your Videos Without Breaking the Bank

Miscellaneous:

Try Tweeting a 30-second Video of Your Science

How to Create a Split Screen Effect with iMovie and Screenflow

How to Find Media at the Library of Congress for Your Video Project

Nine Ways to Tell a Science Story

7 Minutes of Terror (NASA) – How NOT to Bore Your Video Audience

How to Add Captions to Increase Your Audience Reach

How to Shoot Video and Avoid the Most Common Mistakes

How to Use the Connection Storymaker App

How to Create a Time-Lapse Video from Still Images

How to Insert a Watermark into Your Science Video

How to Make a Video Abstract for Your Next Journal Article

Rule of Thirdsscreenshot_ruleofthirds_klmckee

How to Create an Interactive Map of your Study Sites

How to Make your Science Video Memorable

How to Capture and Keep the Viewer’s Attention

How to Use Readability Statistics to Improve Your Science Video

Are Your Science Videos Understandable by a Diverse Audience?

Where Should I Publish My Science Video?

Recent Posts

12 Filming Mistakes to Avoid

In the process of learning how to make a video, we all make rookie mistakes. That is, unless we are warned about them. I made a lot of mistakes when I first began making science videos. However, I avoided some of the most common filming errors by reading about them or watching tutorials. I recently gave a lecture to a university class about how to make a video with a smartphone. This particular science course requires the students to make a video about one of the topics covered in the course. One of the topics I always cover in these lectures is common filming mistakes.

When I finished the lecture and was walking back to my car, the thought occurred to me that I could use my lecture presentation (made with Prezi) to make a helpful video about avoiding common filming mistakes. Later, I recorded that part of my lecture about filming mistakes with the screencapture software, Screenflow, along with my voiceover. All I had to do was play my presentation fullscreen on my computer while Screenflow recorded the screen and my voice. I then edited the footage in Screenflow to trim out unwanted sections and to insert The Scientist Videographer intro/outro at the beginning and end of the video. It took about fifteen minutes. My point is that recording your lectures, seminars, or conference presentations is a really easy way to make a video.

If you have a presentation made in PowerPoint, Prezi, Keynote, or some other application, you should be able to use that as the basis for a video about your science topic. Some journals are even encouraging authors to use this approach to create a video abstract that will accompany their scientific article. So, it may be worthwhile to know how to make a video this way.

Here is the video I made:

  1. How to Make a Custom Thumbnail for Your YouTube Videos Leave a reply
  2. Female Scientist Stereotypes in Film 2 Replies
  3. Book Giveaway Leave a reply
  4. Barriers to Science Communication and How to Overcome Them Leave a reply