Author Biography

Karen_McKeeDr. Karen McKee is a scientist with forty years of research experience. Her educational training includes a B.S. in zoology and a M.S. and a Ph.D. in botany. She has studied various aspects of wetlands, more recently focusing on global change effects of elevated carbon dioxide, climate change, and rising sea level. Her research has spanned multiple international locations, including the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Belize, Panama, Honduras, Brazil, The Netherlands, Denmark, China, Australia, and New Zealand. Dr. McKee’s research has been published in over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. She is a frequent invited speaker at international conferences and has delivered more than 150 technical presentations and seminars. Dr. McKee is co-founder and trustee of The Wetland Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides travel grants to students of wetland science. She has produced several peer-reviewed videos that describe her research as well as topics of general interest such as climate change, sea-level rise, hurricanes, and large river deltas. Dr. McKee has actively promoted science communication by scientists and worked to encourage more scientists and science students to acquire better multimedia skills. To this end, she has produced many free tutorials to train scientists in the use of video for science communication and hosts a video blog, The Scientist Videographer, where she provides additional advice andfish_karenlmckee information. Her ebook, The Scientist Videographer, is the culmination of years of experience as a science communicator.

In addition to science and videography, she also enjoys painting, fishing, hiking, and botanizing.

Recent Posts

Video Recording with a Webcam: How to Use a Script and Keep Your Eyes on the Camera

In the last post, I talked about the issue of keeping your eyes on the camera (or appearing to do so) while recording a video, especially if you have a lot of points to make. The best option that allows you to constantly look at the camera while delivering your lines is a teleprompter. However, most people don’t have a teleprompter or know how to use one (I’m working on a new tutorial to show how to use a teleprompter).

So, I decided to investigate a simpler approach, which is to sit in front of a computer and record myself speaking to the camera–with a script. There are a few tricks to making this work, which I’ve summarized in the video provided below:

  1. Recording a Video with a Computer and a Script Leave a reply
  2. Use Video to Debunk Bad Science Leave a reply
  3. How to Add Video to Your PowerPoint Talk Leave a reply
  4. Video As A Scientific Research Tool Leave a reply