LumaFusion (2019) Tutorial: Video Editing on iPhone & iPad

In this tutorial series, learn how to edit your videos on iPhone or iPad using LumaFusion 2019. In Part 1, I introduce the workspace and show how to trim clips and begin building your video. In Part 2, I cover various adjustments such as creating cutaways and picture in picture, modifying the audio, and adding text titles and transitions. These basics will get you started editing video like a professional.

I found the LumaFusion app to be fairly easy to navigate, and it worked well with the touchscreen on my iPhone. Although sometimes I found it difficult to see some elements in the timeline (e.g., transitions), I was able to make them larger by expanding the view (using the pinch-zoom gesture). (This would be less of a problem on an iPad.)

The various framing tools allow quick resizing and positioning of a video clip or photo.The ability to use multiple tracks is a big plus. I also like the advanced text titles tool, which lets you select font style, size, and color, along with other options such as outlining and opacity. Additionally useful are the galleries of presets, which allow you to quickly make routine adjustments. Although not covered in my tutorial, you can create custom presets and save them to a gallery for repeated use. Overall, the app seems to be well designed and has few glitches.

How to Use YouTube’s Audio Library

Music and sound effects can enhance a video and the viewer’s experience. However, finding music and other audio tracks that are free to use is not always easy. YouTube has compiled a library of audio tracks for YouTube creators. YouTube has also made it easier to search and find an appropriate audio track (using filters such as genre, duration, attribution requirements). If you have a YouTube channel, you can use your Video Manager to find and add a music track to your uploaded video.

In a new tutorial, I show how to use YouTube’s Audio Library of free music and sound effects tracks in your videos.

How to Handle Negative Comments about Your Videos

Have you ever gotten a comment about one of your videos that contained a personal attack or profanity? Are you wondering how best to deal with such comments? About comments that are just critical? In a new video, I offer my perspective and experiences and describe ways to deal with negative comments, including how to handle comments that are critical but otherwise civil.

There are lots of other videos out there that offer additional perspectives and strategies for dealing with people who leave hateful comments. Here are links to a few that I think are especially worth watching:

How to Deal with Haters & Negative Comments on YouTube

How to Deal with Negative Comments on YouTube — 5 Tips

How to Deal With Negative YouTube Comments

Video Recording with a Webcam: How to Use a Script and Keep Your Eyes on the Camera

In the last post, I talked about the issue of keeping your eyes on the camera (or appearing to do so) while recording a video, especially if you have a lot of points to make. The best option that allows you to constantly look at the camera while delivering your lines is a teleprompter. However, most people don’t have a teleprompter or know how to use one (I’m working on a new tutorial to show how to use a teleprompter).

So, I decided to investigate a simpler approach, which is to sit in front of a computer and record myself speaking to the camera–with a script. There are a few tricks to making this work, which I’ve summarized in the video provided below:

How to Add Video to Your PowerPoint Talk

Have you watched colleagues give a conference talk or seminar containing video clips and wondered how they did it? Or perhaps you’ve tried embedding a video in your PowerPoint presentation, but it did not play well or at all? In a new tutorial, I walk the viewer through the steps to preparing and inserting a video into PowerPoint so that it plays properly. I used PowerPoint Version 2016 and a Mac for the tutorial, but the tools and options covered are also available for PCs.

If you have an earlier version of PowerPoint, some of the options I talked about may not be available. Also, if the host computer (used to project the slideshow) is running an old version (prior to 2013) of PowerPoint, you may have problems playing your embedded videos. The reason is that older versions of Windows and Mac use linking rather than embedding, and the path to the videos may not work. I’ve gotten around this problem (going from a Mac to a PC running older versions) by putting the PowerPoint file in a folder with all the video files (it’s good practice anyway to put all images and videos used in your presentation into a single folder). I transfer the entire folder to the host computer, and most of the time the videos play fine. If that doesn’t work, it may be a problem with the video format/codec not compatible with the host computer. The only fix is to convert all your videos to the format/codec compatible with that computer.

But the best way to avoid playback problems is to use your own computer during your talk.